Welcome to the Dill Pickle

Your neighborhood grocery store, open to all!

Community Owned

Democratically owned by you, the customer.

Locally Focused

Bringing you the freshest local foods and artisanal products.

Natural and Organic

Committed to providing sustainably grown food you can trust.

In Budget In Season

In Budget In Season is a series of pocket-sized recipe books with delcious, seasonal, main course dishes for $4 per serving or less. The just-released harvest collection--and the ingredients!--can be found at the co-op or on our recipes page. Mmm...spicy sauteed kale over rice...

Dill Pickle Singles Potluck

Nothing brings people together like good food, so we're hosting a Dill Pickle singles meet n' greet at Cole's Bar! Meet fellow co-op fans and bring a dish to share.

Sunday, November 17th
At Cole's
2338 N. Milwaukee
5pm - 7:30pm

HOO v2.3

The Dill Pickle loves our Hands-On Owners and to prove it, we're revamping our HOO program. HOO v2.3 features an in-depth orientation program, more structured work shifts and more opportunities to meet your fellow Hands-On Owners! We're kicking things off with three group orientations in the month of November. All co-op owners are encouraged to attend, be they interested in volunteering at the co-op, current HOOs or just interested in learning about the Dill Pickle history, operations and governance. Visit our Hands-On Owner page for more!

Produce Corner - Parsnips

The Produce Corner is a collaborative column by farmer and Dill Pickle owner Rob Montalbano and Dill Pickle's Produce Lead Buyer, Kristen Martinek. Here Rob shares info on some of his favorite in-season veggies including history, cooking ideas and storage tips; Kristen offers nutritional information and additional recipe ideas. Rob lives and works with his wife Christina on their farm in Sandwich, IL.

Pity the poor parsnip!

Misunderstood cousin of the glorious carrot, the parsnip is just not that familiar to most of us. Usually grown in the fall so that Autumn's cold weather can turn starches to sugars, the parsnip can be quite sweet and nutty. When people ask me how to eat local during the winter in Chicago, the parsnip is my go-to vegetable. Parsnips store very well and they often last into spring. They are absolutely fantastic when mixed with other roots crops that, incidentally, also store well through the wintertime.

Look for parsnips with good color and firm roots. If they do get soft, use them up right away. Parsnips are great roasted, and in stews and soups. Like most vegetables, I say to leave the skins on for the most nutrients. You'll never even notice. Store parsnips in the crisper section of your refrigerator, wrapped in plastic or a damp towel, and keep them moist – not wet - and cold.

My favorite parsnip recipe is also a simple one. Head on down to the Co-op and get yourself some parsnips, carrots, potatoes, olive oil, and a favorite, fresh herb. Cut the parsnips, potatoes and carrots into one inch slices and mix with olive oil, herb, and then salt and pepper to taste. Roast at 425 for about a half hour, until they are just getting tender. Delicious! - Rob

I have to say parsnips are one of my favorite fall root crops. While most folks are adding pumpkin to anything and everything they can, I'm adding parsnip to anything & everything I can. And yes, this includes juicing it  (for those of you who know me, know I'm an avid juicer!). I love the sweet crunch raw but roasting it like Rob shared in his recipe above, brings its sweetness to a whole other level! It's simply amazing! Nutritionally speaking, parnsips are excellent sources of vitamin C, folic acid, and fiber. With it's vitamin C content, this is a great local food option to munch on all winter to keep your immune system in check! In addiiton to roasting, parsnips are a wonderful addition to soups. Check out this vegan curried carrot & parsnip soup next time your craving a hearty, warm bowl of something delicious. YUM! And I can't possibly write this without paying tribute to oven-baked parsnip fries... DOUBLE YUM! - Kristen

Produce Corner - Delicata Squash

The Produce Corner is a collaborative column by farmer and Dill Pickle owner Rob Montalbano and Dill Pickle's Produce Lead Buyer, Kristen Martinek. Here Rob shares info on some of his favorite in-season veggies including history, cooking ideas and storage tips; Kristen offers nutritional information and additional recipe ideas. Rob lives and works with his wife Christina on their farm in Sandwich, IL.

This time of year brings, literally, truckloads of winter squash to the markets each week. After growing for almost the entire summer, these veggies are ready to shine. All shapes and colors adorn the shelves and it is difficult to know what's what. For those of you that are a little hesitant to try something unfamiliar, allow me to steer you in the right direction: delicata squash. You're gonna thank me for this one, folks.

Delicata squash have a creamy flesh that is even more buttery than butternuts and a tad sweeter than sweet potatoes. They are typically small and oblong, about 6-10 inches long. Delicata have a creamy beige skin with green, yellow or orange stripes. They are the perfect size for making 1-2 servings. Best of all, they are one of the easiest of the winter squash to clean, cut, and cook. Look for firm skins on the delicata and no mold. Like most winter squash, they store well, probably about 3-4 weeks. Keep them in a cool (the refrigerator is too cold) and dark spot.

Here's an easy, classic recipe. Clean the delicata squash and cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds (prepare them like pumpkin seeds!) and coat with a little olive oil. Place in the oven at 425 and bake, turning once or twice. Continue until the sides are golden brown and the texture is creamy. Eat, and savor, with a spoon! - Rob

I thought I had already experienced the best winter squash had to offer.  Acorn, spaghetti, and butternuts were always a regular in my house during the fall & winter. Until my friend introduced me to the delicata at the market one year…edible skin?! Sold. One bite in & I was hooked. Not only are delicata delicious, they also pack in a substantial amount of nutrition and lasting energy with their high percentage of complex carbohydrates. Winter squashes like the delicata are great sources of carotenoids, antioxidants (vitamins A & C), fiber, and even provide some healthy omega-3 fatty acids. These are such an economically friendly winter source of healthy carbohydrates to keep you nourished throughout the winter months. And thanks to farmers like Rob Montalbano, we will have locally sourced, organically grown squash all season long! -Kristen 

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